Food Network? Me?

My "Baby" Cooking Stool
My “Baby” Cooking Stool

Whadda youse crazy? I can’t compete on Food Network.

I don’t like tension in the kitchen. My focus is the food not the drama. And I gotta do things my own way.

When inspired I share recipes on my blog. When my producers’ and my stars align we shoot new cooking episodes for my YouTube channel. That’s it.

But, my producers saw a casting call for Next Food Network Star and they suggested I apply. It’ll be fun, they said. You’ll be great, they said. You’ll love it, they said. They’re sneaky, my producers, and they talked me into it.

I couldn’t make it to LA last month to interview in person so my producers and I decided to shoot a video instead.

For the video, I made one of my favorite dishes, spaghetti aglio e olio. The garlic and olive oil sauce is ready in the time it takes to cook the pasta. It’s typical of dishes I’ve been making for years. A few quality ingredients. Quick simple preparation. Incredible flavor.

This dish is near and dear to my heart because it comes from my mother. My family food traditions have their root in her birth town east of Naples. She learned to cook from her mother and I learned to cook from her.

I love to pass on the traditions, share the recipes that fill my belly and warm my heart.

Now, more than 100 years after my ancestors came to America our favorite dishes still draw us to the table. Our days together, many generations cooking in the kitchen and around the table, are precious.

Anyway, watch me make spaghetti aglio e olio in my Food Network video. It did turn out good if I do say so myself.

And wish me luck! Or maybe not.

Be sure to subscribe so you don’t miss what Food Network says.

5.0 from 2 reviews
Spaghetti Aglio e Olio (Garlic & Olive Oil)
 
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A quick complex sauce ready in the time it takes to cook the pasta.
Author:
Recipe type: Pasta
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 6-8
Ingredients
  • 1 pound (500 grams) imported dried spaghetti
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
  • 3 anchovy filets, roughly chopped
  • ⅛ teaspoon crushed chili flakes
  • 1 tablespoon sea salt
  • 1 cup pasta water
  • ¼ cup grated pecorino
  • Italian flat parsley, roughly chopped (optional)
Instructions
  1. In a large pot bring 4 quarts of water to a boil.
  2. Add the salt.
  3. Cook the pasta to al dente, about 8 minutes.
  4. In a large pan heat the olive oil.
  5. Add the anchovy, garlic and chili and cook over medium-high heat until the anchovy dissolves and the garlic just begins to take on color.
  6. Add the pasta water and mix well.
  7. Over high heat add the drained spaghetti and finish cooking the pasta in the sauce.
  8. Off the heat add the pecorino and mix well.
  9. For a little color sprinkle the parsley on top to add some color before serving.

 

 

Turkey, Stuffing & Gravy the Italian-American Way

Roasted Turkey Infused with rosemary, sage, lemon & garlic resting
Roasted Turkey stuffed with aromatics resting

This year I’m making a roasted boneless turkey breast stuffed with spinach and prosciutto. But I’m thinking fondly of my whole succulent roasted turkey and stuffing. Did I make the wrong choice for my Thanksgiving table?

Nope, I’ve gotten over my ambivalence. I’m sticking with the stuffed turkey breast and roasted garlic & olive oil mashed potatoes. But if you want a whole roasted turkey, with a delicious sausage-chestnut stuffing and classic pan gravy, try my favorite recipes for all three.

The turkey is infused with rosemary, sage, garlic and lemon. The stuffing studded with sausage and chestnuts is a perfect flavorful partner for the moist and tender turkey. The easy pan gravy brings it all together.

Take advantage of that hot oven. Add my easy roasted brussels sprouts and your Thanksgiving plate is complete.

Make up your mind already. Which way will you go this Thanksgiving?

Either way make my pumpkin ricotta cheesecake the day before to top off your holiday festivities.

Buon appetito! Happy Thanksgiving!

Father’s Day: Mussels with Hot Tomato Sauce

Mussels with a hot tomato sauce
Mussels with a hot tomato sauce

Father’s Day is June 15. You know me. Holidays bring back food memories. Here’s one from my Dad Gennaro (aka Jerry).

My Mom was always at the stove so my Dad didn’t cook often.  But when he did Dad made some really good dishes. This one is one of my favorites.

This is an unusual sauce. It’s not made with whole San Marzano tomatoes that I use in most of my sauces.

I make this one with tomato paste so it’s a really thick and dense sauce that you spoon on top of the mussels laid atop friselle, or hard twice-baked bread slices.

Heat up olive oil in a pot with the hot pepper. I use whole peperoncini, dried chili peppers. When the oil is hot add the tomato paste and the water you used to rinse out the cans and stir well. As it cooks the paste will darken to a red brick color and be really thick. Stir in some oregano.

While the tomato paste is cooking steam the mussels. Watch me steam mussels and clams. This is the technique that you’ll use for this dish.

Make sure you add enough wine and water to the steaming pot. You need a fair amount of the mussel broth to put this dish together.

If you’re lucky to live in an Italian neighborhood you will be able to buy friselle, twice baked bread rounds or rusks at a local bakery. I can’t get them anymore in North Beach so I baked slices of a sourdough loaf from Italian-French Bakery on Grant until they were hard and golden.

This dish may remind you of the sauce at Vincent’s Clam Bar or Umberto’s Clam House in lower Manhattan’s Little Italy. But my guess is that my Dad got this recipe from his mother and the food she cooked at her Quisisana restaurant in Newark’s Italian immigrant First Ward and later in Brooklyn through the 1950s.

The sweet thick tomato sauce surrounds the tender briny mussels just out of the sea. I hate to say it but my favorite bite is the twice-baked bread soaked with mussel broth and topped with the sauce. But I try to slurp in a mussel too. I love the kick from the peperoncini as it all goes down.

Happy Father’s Day. Wanna share your memories of food your Dad made for you?

Buon appetito!

Father's Day: Mussels with Hot Tomato Sauce
 
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Steamed mussels and friselle topped with a spicy tomato paste sauce.
Author:
Recipe type: Seafood
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 24 mussels well-scrubbed, steamed
  • Strained mussel broth from the steaming pot, about 2 cups.
  • 4 friselle or baked bread slices
  • 2 12-ounce cans tomato paste
  • water to slosh-out the paste cans
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 2 peperoncini (dried chili) or 1 tablespoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • ¼ onion, minced
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 2 tablespoons chopped Italian flat parsley
Instructions
  1. Heat the oven to 375 degrees and place 4 pieces of sliced rustic bread on a baking sheet and bake until slightly golden and completely dry, about 15 minutes. Set aside the twice-cooked bread. (Or use friselle, Italian rusks from your bakery.)
  2. Put the olive oil, garlic, onion and peperoncini in a sauce pot over medium-high heat.
  3. When the oil sizzles add the tomato paste and the water used to rinse the cans.
  4. Stir well and when the paste starts to turn to a darker brick red color lower the heat to medium-low and cook for 10 minutes more.
  5. In the meantime steam the mussels using this recipe. http://www.gianni.tv/10-minute-mussels-clams/ or the link above in the post.
  6. Remove the steamed mussels from the pot and strain out the broth. (You should have about 2 cups of mussel broth.)
  7. Add half of the mussel broth to the sauce and mix well.
  8. Remove the top shell from the mussels.
  9. Rub the twice-baked bread with a garlic clove and drizzle each piece with extra virgin olive oil
  10. Put a piece of the twice-baked bread on the bottom of a dish or bowl.
  11. Drizzle some broth over the bread to soften it. (If more liquid is needed use water.)
  12. Spread some sauce over the bread.
  13. Arrange 6 mussels around the bread and top each with sauce.
  14. Sprinkle with each mussel and the bread with extra virgin olive oil and the parsley. Serve immediately.

 

 

Panzanella: Summer Tomato & Bread Salad

Panzanella: Summer Tomato & Bread Salad
Panzanella: Summer Tomato & Bread Salad

A few days ago in a post on my pasta e fagioli video episode, Markus asked that I make panzanella, a simple Tuscan peasant summer salad.

I said I would when the summer tomatoes hit the farmers market. The first crop of Early Girls won’t be in for a few more weeks and the big heirlooms won’t be ready until the end of the summer. I thought I wouldn’t be making panzanella for a while.

But I couldn’t get panzanella out of my mind since Markus’ post. So when I saw a huge selection of tomatoes at Bruins Farms booth at the Ferry Building Farmers Market yesterday I had to buy some and give panzanella a go.

If you’ve been to Tuscany in the summer you’ve enjoyed panzanella. It’s made with days-old dark salt-free Tuscan bread. Recipes for this peasant dish date back to the days of Michelangelo according to Tuscan food maestro Giulliano Bugialli.

This is my modern San Francisco version. While you’ll see recipes with peppers, cucumbers and all sorts of other ingredients in today’s panzanella recipes, I keep it simple.

Tomatoes and a good crusty rustic bread soaked in the olive oil and tomato juices are the stars. My mix today is Lemon Boy, Black Zebra and Beefsteak.

These tomatoes are grown about 70 miles inland from San Francisco, in greenhouses on the farm a bit west of Sacramento where it’s sunnier and warmer than it is here in the City.

Panzanella only has a few ingredients so you have to make sure you’re using the best. These Bruins Farms tomatoes fit the bill and that makes it easier to wait for the big field-grown heirloom tomatoes later this summer.

Make panzanella with day-old rustic bread or switch it up and make it with taralli, those small boiled then baked crunchy rings. You can buy taralli in North Beach at Molinari Deli on Columbus or at A.G. Ferrari’s stores around the Bay Area or online.

The onion and basil round out the flavor of the sweet tomatoes and the juicy, creamy bread cubes perk up each mouthful with a lingering acidic vinegar tingle.

Serve panzanella chilled or at room temperature as an antipasto or as a side for grilled meats or poultry.

Find out more about New York City’s Little Italy, Arthur Avenue in the Bronx. If you’ve been disappointed with what’s left of Little Italy in lower Manhattan visit Arthur Avenue. You’ll find everything you’re looking for.

Buon appetito!

Panzanella: Summer Tomato & Bread Salad
 
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A peasant Tuscan ripe summer tomatoes, basil and day-old bread moistened by the best extra virgin olive oil and tomato juices.
Author:
Recipe type: Appetiser
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 2 large ripe tomatoes
  • ½ red onion
  • 6 basil leaves
  • 3 thick slices of day-old rustic bread
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Cut the tomatoes into 2-inch cubes and put them in a large bowl.
  2. Quarter the onion and slice each quarter very thin and put them in the bowl.
  3. Rip each basil leaf into large pieces and add them to the bowl.
  4. Add the olive oil, sea salt and black pepper and mix all the ingredients well. Set the bowl aside. (The salt will start to draw the juices out of the tomatoes.)
  5. Cut the bread into 2-inch cubes and put them into the bowl with the tomatoes. (Remove the crust if you want but I leave it on to add more texture to the salad.)
  6. Let the salad sit for an hour or so on the counter or in the refrigerator to develop the juices that will be absorbed by the bread.
  7. Mix the salad well before serving.
  8. Serve chilled or at room temperature.

 

Warm Italian Potato Salad

Creamy red & gold potatoes bathed with buttery olive oil and mellow red wine vinegar
Creamy red & gold potatoes bathed with buttery olive oil and mellow red wine vinegar

Here’s a twist on potato salad that I’ve loved since I was a kid.

Don’t get me wrong I love potato salad with mayonnaise but every once in a while I have to make this one flavored with red wine vinegar and olive oil.

It’s simple to make and really flavorful. Cube boiled potatoes while they’re still warm. Add chopped parsley and onions, a sprinkle of sea salt and black pepper, and dress with extra virgin olive oil and vinegar. That’s it.

Creamy potatoes bathed in buttery olive oil, the sweet crunch of onion, all balanced by the red wine vinegar. A simple peasant dish with full and complex flavor.

Serve the potato salad warm or at room temperature. Perfect for any table, inside or out.

Buon appetito!

Italian Potato Salad
 
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A simple potato salad dressed with extra virgin olive oil & red wine vinegar served warm to enjoy it's full flavor.
Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 1 pound small red or Yukon Gold potato (or use both as I do for color & texture variation)
  • 2 tablespoons roughly chopped Italian flat parsley
  • ½ small yellow onion, diced
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1½ tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Boil the potatoes until they are knife tender.
  2. When the potatoes are cool enough to handle cut them into 2-inch cubes.
  3. Put the potatoes in a bowl along with the other ingredients and mix well to coat the potatoes completely.
  4. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

5-Minute Basil Pesto

Gemelli with 5-Minute Basil Pesto
Gemelli with 5-Minute Basil Pesto

Got 5 minutes? You can be eating pasta with fresh and flavorful basil pesto, pesto alla Genovese, in no time.

This pesto hails from Liguria on the northern Italian coast where small leaf basil grows on the hills around Genoa overlooking the Italian Riviera. The roots of North Beach’s Liguria Bakery, famous for it’s foccacia, are in this region of Italy.

I don’t have Ligurian basil so I’m using organic Bay Area basil instead. You can use your local basil as well. Traditionally the pesto is made with a mortar and pestle but I’m using a food processor. It’s fast and yields a fine paste.

The main ingredients are basil, pine nuts (pinoli), garlic, grated parmigiano and pecorino, and a really good extra virgin olive oil. Use the best ingredients you can afford.

Pine nuts from China are prevalent in the market and cheaper but they taste waxy and don’t have the full, clean, nutty flavor of Italian pine nuts so buy Italian pinoli if you can.

The Ligurian version is usually made with trenette, a flat long pasta or trofie, a short twisted pasta. I used gemelli (twins) a short twisted pasta pretty close to the hard to find trofie.

This is an uncooked sauce. Just process all the ingredients in a food processor. The pesto will be ready way before the pasta water comes to a boil.

The short twisted toothy gemelli burst with fresh flavor. The aromatic basil immediately tingles your tongue followed by the nutty flavor of the pinoli and buttery olive oil. The parmigiano, pecorino and just an echo of fresh garlic round out each bite. So simple and so delicious.

A few years ago we got lucky on a visit to Rome. My friend Guiliano who lives in the historical center had just returned from visiting his family in Genoa and he invited us over for dinner. He brought just-picked Ligurian basil back with him and he was making pesto for us. He added cubes of potato and green beans to the pasta and coated it all with the best pesto I’ve ever eaten.

For my American friends adding potato and green beans to this dish is controversial. I like it that way but many don’t. They just want pasta coated with basil pesto. Try it both ways and see which you prefer.

If you want to make the traditional Genovese version, cut the potato in 1/2 chunks. Cut off the stem end of the green beans and cut them into 2-inch pieces. When the pasta water comes to a boil add the potatoes and cook for 5 minutes then add the green beans and cook for another 5 minutes. Then add the pasta and cook to al dente. Strain the pasta, potatoes and beans out of the water, put them all in a bowl, add the pesto and mix to coat everything well.

Basil pesto is the most famous but there are many, many more. Try my Pesto Trapanese from Sicily with cherry tomatoes and almonds for a different taste treat. It’s one of 3 sauces I made for my potato gnocchi.

Buon appetito!

5-Minute Basil Pesto
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Pasta
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 1 pound (500 grams) gemelli or your favorite short cut pasta
  • 3 cups fresh basil leaves, tightly packed
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled
  • ½ tablespoon sea salt plus 3 tablespoons for the pasta water
  • ⅓ cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to cover the pesto
  • ¼ cup pine nuts, lightly toasted
  • 2 tablespoons grated Parmigianno-Reggiano
  • 2 tablespoons grated Pecorino Romano
Instructions
  1. Put 5 quarts of water with 3 tablespoons of sea salt over high heat and bring it to a boil.
  2. In the meantime, put the basil, garlic, salt, and olive oil in the food-processor bowl. Process 10 to 15 seconds, stopping once to scrape down the sides of the bowl, to form a coarse paste.
  3. Put the pine nuts in the food processor and process another 10 seconds, scrape down the bowl midway, until you create a uniform, smooth bright-green paste.
  4. Add the grated cheeses to the bowl and pulse a few times to combine.
  5. The pesto should be thick but flowing. If it is to stiff add a bit more olive oil.
  6. The pesto will be fine at room temperature until you cook the pasta. (If you keep it out longer, cover the top of the pesto with a thin layer of extra virgin olive oil so it doesn't discolor.)
  7. Cook the pasta to al dente, strain and put into a bowl. (Reserve some of the pasta cooking water.)
  8. Add the pesto and mix to coat the pasta well. If the pasta is too dry add some of the pasta cooking water.
  9. Top each serving with a light drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkle of grated cheese.
  10. Serve immediately.
  11. (To store the pesto longer, cover the surface of the pesto with plastic wrap, close the container tightly and refrigerate or freeze the pesto. Let the stored pesto come back to room temperature before using.)

 

A New Ship Docks in North Beach

New North Beach Library Branch
New North Beach Library Branch

Just kidding. You know that North Beach really isn’t a beach anymore. If you took my tour you know why.

Look at the new North Beach Library Branch that opened today. The beautiful sleek design looks like a modern ocean liner slipped it’s Fisherman’s Wharf mooring and ended up smack on Columbus Avenue at Mason near the cable cars and below the crooked turns of Lombard Street.

The library’s opening is the culmination of a long-fought battle between those who opposed the plans entirely or wanted to preserve the old mid-century modernist library building and city planners. The Chronicle’s architecture critic provides the full details in today’s paper.

A big crowd gathered in the warm sun for the opening enjoying a children’s chorus belting out songs from Annie followed by Mal Sharpe’s Big Money in Jazz dixieland band. An expert was giving lessons in the bocce courts across from the new library entrance.

More change is on the way. The old library will be demolished and the Joe DiMaggio Playground will be enlarged and renovated next year.

Boy am I happy that this northern fringe of North Beach has come alive again. Be sure to visit soon.

BTW, behind me in the video is North Beach poet and visual artist Agneta Falk‘s How Long/The Storm that she painted while watching a violent thunder storm over Fisherman’s Wharf.

Limoncello: Sunshine in a Glass

The lemons in Sorrento and the Amalfi Coast are huge
The lemons in Sorrento and the Amalfi Coast are huge

When some people have a lemon they make lemonade. When I have lemons I make limoncello, the famous liqueur from Sorrento on the Bay of Naples.

Limoncello is sunshine in a bottle. One sip and I overflow with memories of Sorrento, Capri and the Amalfi Coast, bright sunshine, an azure sea and the scent of lemons.

It’s a wonderful digestivo and a refreshing end to a meal. A little Limoncello spilled over vanilla gelato for dessert maybe?

Save some money and make limoncello for yourself. Watch me make limoncello in this first installment of intimate moments with Gianni, sometimes in the kitchen, sometimes not.

I like my limoncello on the dry side. If you like it sweeter add another half or full cup of sugar to this recipe.

Cin-Cin!

Limoncello: Sunshine in a Glass
 
Mottled yellow-green lemon peel soaked in grain alcohol and sweetened with simple syrup is a refreshing end to any meal.
Author:
Recipe type: Liqueur
Cuisine: Italian
Ingredients
  • 12 organic lemons
  • 1 quart grain alcohol (substitute vodka if you must)
  • 6 cups water
  • 2 cups sugar (more if you want a sweeter liqueur)
Instructions
  1. Wash and dry the lemons.
  2. Peel the lemons so that you just get the yellow zest and not the bitter white pith.
  3. Put the zests in a large jar with a tight-fitting lid, add the alcohol and let sit in a dark place. Shake the jar a few times each day.
  4. After 2-4 days the zests will look like pale parchment and have given up their oils. Strain the liquid and discard the spent zests.
  5. Make the simple syrup. Put the water and sugar in a pot and heat it over a medium flame, stirring until all the sugar is dissolved and the liquid is clear.
  6. When the simple syrup is cool stir it into the alcohol.
  7. Pour the limoncello into bottles and close them tightly. Store the limoncello in the freezer or dark place. It's good to drink immediately but the flavor will be smoother after about a week.
  8. Serve in small glasses right out of the freezer or at room temperature.

 

 

Pasta Fazool, Pasta e Fagioli, Pasta & Beans

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When the stars make you drool just like a pasta fazool, that's amore.
When the stars make you drool just like a pasta fazool, that’s amore.

I ate a lot of pasta and beans growing up in Jersey. My Mom made it often and I loved it.

So when pasta fazool, as we called it back East, was a Viewer’s Choice suggestion from lovelyamor13 on YouTube, I was very happy to make it.

Pasta e fagioli is healthy and inexpensive peasant dish. You can have this one-pot meal that packs lots of flavor and goodness on your table in less than an hour.

Pasta e fagioli is made all over Italy and varies from region to region. One big difference is that mine has no meat. Up north they usually add pancetta to the aromatics as the base of the soup. Some people like to add tomato puree. Some people don’t add tomato, they like a white pasta fazool.

Mine has a light pink hue. I use a little tomato puree. Make it any way you like it, just don’t make it the way they do at Olive Garden.

The creamy beans and pasta are bathed in a savory light broth enhanced by the sharpness of the pecorino and the mellow olive oil. Pasta fazool will warm you and fill you up. Make extra so you can eat it again the next day.

Buon appetito!

5.0 from 3 reviews
Pasta Fazool, Pasta e Fagioli, Pasta & Beans
 
A healthy, inexpensive Italian peasant dish, ditalini pasta & cannellini beans
Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Italian
Ingredients
  • ½ onion
  • 2 stalks celery
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 tablespoons EVOO
  • ½ cup tomato puree
  • 1 cup dried cannellini beans, soaked overnight or one 15 oz. can
  • 8 cups water
  • ½ pound ditalini or another short-cut pasta
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 3 tablespoons fresh Italian parsley, roughly chopped
  • grated pecorino
Instructions
  1. If you are using dried beans soak about 1¼ cups overnight or for at least 12 hours. They will expand and should yield about 3 cups of soaked beans for the soup.
  2. Roughly chop the onion, celery and garlic.
  3. Put the EVOO, onions and celery in a large enameled pot.
  4. Over medium heat, sauté the onions and celery until translucent, about 5 minutes. (You do not want them to pick up any color.)
  5. Add the garlic and bay leaf and sauté for another minute.
  6. Add the cannellini beans and mix well.
  7. Add the water and tomato puree to the pot. Stir well.
  8. Put the cover on the pan and simmer over medium-low heat stirring occasionally, until the beans are tender and the soup thickens. You want the beans to be tender but not mushy.)
  9. Add salt and black pepper to taste.
  10. Add the pasta and cook until the pasta is al dente, about 8-10 minutes more.
  11. Shut off the heat and add the parsley. Mix well.
  12. Serve in bowls immediately with a sprinkle of pecorino and a drizzle of EVOO.
  13. Serves 6.

 

Pasta e Fagioli (Pasta Fazool/Pasta & Beans)
Author: www.Gianni.tv
Ingredients
  • ½ onion
  • 2 stalks celery
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 tablespoons EVOO
  • ½ cup tomato puree
  • 3 cups dried cannellini beans, soaked overnight or two 15 oz. cans
  • 8 cups water
  • ½ pound ditalini or another short-cut pasta
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 3 tablespoons fresh Italian parsley, roughly chopped
  • grated pecorino
Instructions
  1. If you are using dried beans soak about 1¼ cups overnight or for at least 12 hours. They will expand and should yield about 3 cups of soaked beans for the soup.
  2. Roughly chop the onion, celery and garlic.
  3. Put the EVOO, onions and celery in a large enameled pot.
  4. Over medium heat, sauté the onions and celery until translucent, about 5 minutes. (You do not want them to pick up any color.)
  5. Add the garlic and bay leaf and sauté for another minute.
  6. Add the cannellini beans and mix well.
  7. Add the water and tomato puree to the pot. Stir well.
  8. Put the cover on the pan and simmer over medium-low heat stirring occasionally, until the beans are tender and the soup thickens. (If you are using canned beans that should take about about 20-30 minutes. If you are using dried beans soaked over night that could take 60 minutes or so. You want the beans to be tender but not mushy.)
  9. Add salt and black pepper to taste.
  10. Add the pasta and cook until the pasta is al dente, about 8-10 minutes more.
  11. Shut off the heat and add the parsley. Mix well.
  12. Serve in bowls immediately with a sprinkle of pecorino and a drizzle of EVOO.
  13. Serves 6.

Baby Artichokes: Eat the Whole Thing

Crispy baby artichokes
Crispy baby artichokes

Baby artichokes are in the market at a very attractive price. I bought some to create a crispy delight.

Be sure to buy plenty. This is another one of those treats that gets poached off the stove by family and friends before the baby artichokes even make it to the table.

Baby artichokes are super easy to clean and cook. Best of all you can eat the whole thing. There’s no prickly choke to get rid of.

Crispy golden-brown leaves add a nutty note to the creamy artichoke heart. A simple way to savor the essence of the artichoke without breaking a sweat.

Serve the baby artichokes as part of an antipasto course or as a side for meat or poultry.

Want more? Watch me make stuffed artichokes in the style of the ghetto in Rome.

Buon appetito!

Baby Artichokes: Eat the Whole Thing
 
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Enjoy baby artichokes in way less than 30 minutes.
Author:
Recipe type: Appetiser
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 12 baby artichokes
  • 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • sea salt
Instructions
  1. Squeeze the juice of half a lemon into a bowl of water.
  2. Cut off the discolored bottom of the stem. Trim any dark green skin from the bottom of the stem.
  3. Pull off the dark outer leaves until the tender yellow and pale green leaves appear.
  4. Cut off the tip of the artichoke at the line separating the dark from the pale part of the leaf.
  5. Put the cleaned artichoke in the acidulated water.
  6. Put on a pot of water to boil over high heat. Cook the artichokes until knife tender.
  7. When cool enough to handle, cut the artichokes in half length-wise.
  8. Put the olive oil in a cast iron or saute pan. When the oil starts to ripple cook the artichokes flat side down until golden brown.
  9. Remove the artichokes to a serving plate crispy flat side up and sprinkle with sea salt with some lemon wedges scattered around.
  10. Serve immediately or at room temperature.

 

 

Cacio e Pepe: Spaghetti with a No-Cook Pecorino & Black Pepper Sauce

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Cacio e pepe
Cacio e pepe is a minimalist Italian version of mac and cheese.

It’s ridiculous how a few quality ingredients can make such a sumptuous pasta dish. When in Rome cacio e pepe is one of two pasta dishes that I order at one of my favorite restaurants as soon as I arrive.

If you’re really hungry and want something simple to eat this no-cook sauce is for you. Boil well-salted water, cook the spaghetti and you’re almost done.

When the spaghetti is al dente, fish it out of the water and put it in a big bowl. Pour a cup of hot pasta water over the spaghetti, stir in the grated pecorino & freshly ground black pepper, toss and your ready to eat.

The silky zesty pecorino sauce clings to every strand of spaghetti and the black pepper explodes in your mouth. I couldn’t stop eating this one.

Be sure to buy the best spaghetti from Italy that you can. I prefer pasta from a small producer in and around Naples. This pasta could cost you 4 or 5 dollars but it’s worth every penny. Their durum wheat pasta extruded through a bronze die has a deep nutty wheat flavor and the rough surface holds sauce well. In a pinch I use De Cecco.

Buy a hunk of pecorino romano from Italy and grate just before using to maximize its taste. Buy quality black peppercorns and coarsely grind or crush them so that you fully enjoy their robust flavor and texture.

Oh, and that other pasta dish I can’t wait to eat when I get to Roma, spaghetti carbonara. Let me know if you want me to make that one in a future episode. Just leave a comment.

I often make a spaghetti pie when I have cacio e pepe left over. Just add beaten eggs, mix and bake it until the spaghetti strands on top are golden and nutty. It’s an easy way of getting a second day of enjoyment out of this tasty dish. You can make a spaghetti pie too.

Buon appetito!

5.0 from 1 reviews
Cacio e Pepe: Spaghetti with a No-Cook Pecorino & Black Pepper Sauce
 
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Author:
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 1 pound (500 grams) spaghetti
  • 1 cup grated pecorino romano
  • freshly coarsely ground black pepper to taste
  • sea salt for the pasta water
Instructions
  1. Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil over high heat.
  2. When the water reaches a rapid boil add the spaghetti. Toss the spaghetti to make sure it doesn't stick.
  3. While the spaghetti is cooking grate the pecorino, half on the coarse grate and half on the fine grate.
  4. Coarsely grind black pepper or crack them with a pan or a meat pounder.
  5. When the spaghetti is al dente fish it out with tongs and put it in a big bowl. (Save 2 cups of pasta water if you drain it in a colander.)
  6. Add a cup of pasta water to the bowl and toss to moisten the spaghetti.
  7. Add the grated pecorino and toss. If the pasta is too dry add more pasta water to form a silky sauce.
  8. Add the black pepper and toss the spaghetti well.
  9. Serve immediately. Have some pecorino and the pepper mill on the table for your guests to add more if they want.

 

Baked Baby Eggplant via Japan

Baked Baby Eggplant

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Baked baby eggplant makes a great centerpiece for an antipasti platter.
Baked baby eggplant makes a great centerpiece for an antipasti platter.

Baked Italian baby eggplant is a favorite blog text recipe post so we decided to show you how to make it. Let me know if there are other recipe posts or other Italian dishes you want me to cook and maybe we’ll add them to our upcoming video episode list.

We’re in the worst drought ever here in California.

My produce guys tell me prices are already on the rise because of the drought. 60% of America’s produce comes from California so we’ll all be paying 15-20% more.

Even as prices rise, keep on buying local organic produce. The quality of the ingredients is vital. There are only 4 key ingredients in this dish so they all have to shine.

The only two days of heavy rain this whole winter had to be when I’m out food shopping over the weekend for the 3 episodes shot on Monday. I know we need the rain but that doesn’t mean I can’t complain.

I was a man on a mission. Off I went to the Ferry Building Saturday farmer’s market in the rain. No Italian baby eggplant. I hit at least six other markets and baby Italian eggplant were nowhere to be found. All I got was wet.

I panicked. I needed eggplant for Monday’s shoot. While scouring the city I caught a glimpse of dark eggplant on a sidewalk stand as the bus passed Grant Street in Chinatown. I made my way back to the produce stand and there I found not the Italian baby eggplant I desperately needed but Japanese eggplant instead.

I prefer the baby Italian eggplant but if I can't get 'em Japanese eggplant will do just fine.
I prefer the baby Italian eggplant but if I can’t get ’em Japanese eggplant will do just fine.

I was about to pass them up when I said to myself “Hey, you got a show to shoot. Whaddaya gonna do? Buy these. Stupido! This happens to other people too, so it’s an improvisation lesson.”

After chasing all over the city, I had developed a “woolie” (a craving) for these baked eggplant. I had to make them.

So that’s why I’m using Japanese eggplant that are readily available in the market. If you can’t get the Italian baby eggplant, use the Japanese.

The taste and texture is as good as baking the small black-purple Italian ones. But if I find them in market, I go for the baby Italians every time.

Zesty crispy tomato and pecorino top sweet creamy soft eggplant inside the flavorful shriveled skin. The essence of eggplant in every single bite. Serve it by itself or as the centerpiece of an antipasti course. Just add some prosciutto & cheese to the platter and some olives too.

If you like eggplant watch me make my favorite dish eggplant parmigiano.

Keep on cooking. Buon appetito!

4.7 from 3 reviews
Baked Baby Eggplant via Japan
 
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Intense creamy baked baby eggplant topped with San Marzano tomatoes, oregano and pecorino.
Author:
Recipe type: Vegetable
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 4 Italian baby eggplants
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1 cup Italian canned San Marzano tomatoes, crushed well by hand
  • ¼ cup pecorino, grated
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • ½ cup water
Instructions
  1. Heat the oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Cut off the stem of the Italian baby eggplant and cut each in half. (If you're using Japanese eggplant, cut off most of the narrow neck.)
  3. Lightly score the top of the eggplant on the diagonal in both directions to form diamonds.
  4. Put the eggplant in a single layer in a baking dish cut side up.
  5. Drizzle each half generously with EVOO.
  6. Sprinkle sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.
  7. Evenly distribute the crushed tomato on top of each half.
  8. Sprinkle the oregano on top of the crushed tomato.
  9. Sprinkle the grated pecorino evenly on each half.
  10. Pour the water in the bottom of the baking dish.
  11. Add some olive oil and tomatoes to the water. (This will make a pan sauce to put over the eggplant before you serve them.)
  12. Cover the baking dish tightly with foil.
  13. Bake until the eggplant are knife tender, about 20 to 30 minutes.
  14. Reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees.
  15. Uncover the pan and bake until the pecorino is lightly browned and the eggplant start to collapse in on themselves, 10 to 15 minutes more.
  16. Serve hot or at room temperature.
  17. Serves 4-6

 

Black Kale Steam/Sauteed with Garlic & Chili

Tuscan Black Kale
Tuscan Black Kale
Tuscan black kale will make you want to devour your veggies!

Don’t miss the next recipe video: Subscribe now to my YouTube channel.

I love leafy vegetables cooked using this easy steam/saute method. You can have delicious and healthy vegetables on your table in about 15 minutes.

Heat up olive oil, garlic and chili flakes in a big pan. Throw in the leafy greens and coat them all with the oil. Add a little water and bring it to a rapid simmer. Cover the pan.

In a few minutes take off the lid and let the water evaporate. Saute the wilted greens in the garlic-infused oil until they’re tender.

All of the healthy vegetable goodness stays in the pan and the perfectly cooked tender greens flecked with garlic and chili flake glisten in the sheen of the olive oil.

Choose your favorite leafy vegetable, chard, brocolli rabe, escarole. But don’t be limited to greens. The steam/saute method works with most vegetables.

I cooked a vegetable with many names. Black kale because of its color. Dino(saur) kale because of the large leaf’s rough surface. Tuscan kale from the region in Italy where it is a favored ingredient for ribollita, the famous Tuscan twice boiled soup.

Call it what you want. Just make some soon. It’s vegan, Mediterranean, and if you leave out the bread, it’s even paleo!

The intense slightly bitter kale flavor is mellowed by the buttery olive oil. The heat of the chili flake warms your throat with each swallow.

Eat a bowl of kale as a light lunch or serve it as a side for your main course. Have a hunk of crusty bread handy to sop up the sauce that’s left on the plate.

Italians eat fantastic food but the Mediterranean Diet, most prominent in southern Italy, is healthy as well. I eat lots of vegetables and fruits locally grown and in season, legumes, nuts and grains. I love fish. Extra virgin olive oil is my fat of choice. I eat meat in moderation and sweets from time to time.

My meals are delicious and nutritious. Yours can be too.

So eat your vegetables! Roast some sausage to serve with steam/sauteed broccoli rabe for a complete meal. Or for something entirely different make a green bean and red onion salad.

Gianni’s Tip: I removed the thick tough stem at the base of each kale leaf. I saved the stems as I do with all my vegetable trimmings. Set the trimmings aside and throw them in the pot the next time you make a broth or soup for extra flavor. If you don’t use the trimmings immediately, just bag them and put them in the freezer for later.

Use it all up. Head towards zero waste in your kitchen. You’ll be happy and the planet will be too.

Buon appetito!

5.0 from 2 reviews
Black Kale Steam/Sauteed with Garlic & Chili
 
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Author:
Recipe type: vegetables
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 2 bunches of kale (look for "Lacinato" on the tag) or your favorite leafy vegetable
  • 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
  • ⅛ teaspoon crushed hot red pepper flakes
  • sea salt to taste
  • ½ cup water
Instructions
  1. Wash the kale well.
  2. Cut out the tough stem as the bottom of each leaf.
  3. Cut the kale into 2 inch ribbons.
  4. Put the olive oil, pepper flakes and garlic in a large pot with a lid and heat the oil over medium heat until the garlic just starts to turn translucent.
  5. Add the kale and sea salt to taste.
  6. Pour in the water, bring to a rapid simmer, and cover the pot tightly with the lid.
  7. Steam, lifting the lid to stir occasionally, until the kale is wilted, about 5 minutes.
  8. Uncover and cook over medium heat until the liquid is mostly evaporated and the kale is tender, about 5 minutes.
  9. Serve immediately.

 

Tortellini in Brodo: Homemade Stuffed Pasta in Broth

Tortellini in Brodo
Tortellini in Brodo
Tortellini in Brodo–don’t forget the parmigiano reggiano!

I always have to satisfy a variety of diets at my table. A recent lunch gathering was no exception – vegetarians amongst the meat eaters! But, I had a strategy…

My method for vegetable sides, sauces or soups is to start with the universal base.

In the video I explain how to stage the cooking so that you end up with a vegetarian version of tortellini in brodo, and a roasted meat and vegetable stuffed tortellini in a chicken brodo, too.

It’s a traditional dish from Emilia-Romagna, the region of Italy around Bologna, called the “culinary heart” of Italia.

They’re famous for stuffed pasta among many other culinary wonders – mortadella (the original bologna), parmigiano reggiano, prosciutto and balsamic among them.

The tortellini’s rich roasted meat and vegetable stuffing is enrobed in a silky yet toothsome pasta skin. Scoop one up in your spoon filled with the delicate deep-flavored chicken broth and you’ll be in heaven.

Watch me make fresh pasta to use for the tortellini.

Buon appetito!

Tortellini in Brodo Recipe 2 Ways: Homemade Stuffed Pasta in Broth
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Itaian
Serves: 6
Ingredients
Brodo
  • 1 onion, cut in chunks
  • 1 carrot, cut in chunks
  • 1 rib celery, cut in chunks
  • 1 garlic clove, smashed
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 cups water
  • 1 pound chicken parts
Tortellini Filling
  • 8 ounces pork shoulder, cut in 2-inch cubes
  • 2 ounces pancetta, (thick slice) cubed
  • 2 ounces mortadella (thick slice), cubed
  • 11/2 teaspoons crumbled dried porcini
  • 1 small onion, cut in small pieces
  • 1 rib of celery, cut in small pieces
  • 1 small carrot, cut in small pieces
  • 11/2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 stem of rosemary, leaves only
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • ½ cup grated parmigiano
  • pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Pasta
  • (Watch me make the pasta dough in my fresh ravioli video episode.)
Instructions
Brodo
  1. Put a big pot over medium-high heat.
  2. Add the olive oil.
  3. When the oil begins to ripple add the onion, carrot, and celery.
  4. Saute the vegetables until the onion is translucent. (You don't want the vegetables to pick up any color.)
  5. Add the water and bring the pot to a gentle boil.
  6. (For the vegetarian version let the vegetable broth cook for about 20 minutes and set some aside before adding the chicken.)
  7. Add the chicken and cook until the meat begins to fall off the bone.
  8. Strain all of the ingredients over a big bowl to collect the broth.
  9. Over medium-high heat return the broth to the low boil.
Filling
  1. Heat the oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Put the pork, mortadella, pancetta, all the vegetables, and rosemary in a shallow baking pan.
  3. Add the tomato paste and mix to coat everything well.
  4. Add the water to the pan.
  5. Roast in the oven until everything is knife tender and browned.
  6. (For the vegetarian version roast the vegetables and meats in separate roasting dishes and mince only the vegetables in the food processor, add the egg, parmigiano and nutmeg to stuff the vegetarian tortellini.)
  7. When the roasted pork and vegetables have cooled put everything in a food processor bowl and pulse until everything is minced well.
  8. Put the mixture in a bowl, add the egg, nutmeg and parmigiano and mix well.
Pasta
  1. Use the recipe for ravioli on gianni.tv. Watch me make it at http://www.gianni.tv/fresh-pasta-ricotta-ravioli-in-a-san-marzano-sauce/
Making the torellini
  1. Lay out a long fresh pasta sheet.
  2. Cut the sheet in 3-inch squares.
  3. Wet the edges of each square with water. (I use dip my thumb in a bowl of water.)
  4. Add ½ teaspoon of the filling near a tip of square.
  5. Fold over the other half of the square and pinch the seam to tightly close it.
  6. Wrap the tortellini around your finger, pull the 2 ends together and squeeze the ends together.
  7. Put the tortellini on a floured kitchen towel. Make sure they don't touch or they'll stick together.
  8. When the broth is at a low boil add the tortellini and stir them so they don't stick. (The tortellini are delicate so you don't want a rapid boil.)
  9. When the tortellini raise to the surface let them roll in the boil for about a minute and they should be al dente and ready to come out. (Eat one if you're not sure they're done.)
  10. Serve immediately with grated parmigiano for your guests to sprinkle on top of each bowl.

 

 

North Beach is San Francisco’s Heart

Worth the wait!
Santo’s Cannolo at Cavali Cafe–A North Beach Treasure

So says Carl Nolte in today’s Chronicle.

“People will tell you that South of Market is the new center of San Francisco. But North Beach has all the contradictions that made San Francisco what it is. And for my money the heart of the town is North Beach.”

Molinari’s Deli, early morning tai chi in Washington Square, lunch at Original Joe’s where a mistress may be at the next table, Liguria Bakery’s fantastic focaccia, Carl surveys it all in his ode to North Beach.

You know how much I love North Beach. Come along with me as I scour what’s left of North Beach’s Italian-American neighborhood to get all the fixings for a 4-course meal with friends last weekend. Homemade ricotta and mozzarella ravioli in a San Marzano tomato-basil sauce were the star of that 4-hour meal. Santo’s incredible cannoli weren’t too bad either.

Wayne Thiebaud's Laguna Rising
Wayne Thiebaud’s Laguna Rising

Only one week left to see the incredible Memory Mountains, the Wayne Thiebaud exhibit at the Paul Thiebaud Gallery on Chestnut Street at the fringe of North Beach.

You may know Wayne Thiebaud from his luscious cake paintings or the gum ball machine. I love his landscapes as well.

At 94 Wayne remains a prolific artist. The exhibit features his recent work and older food and landscape paintings that give the exhibit context over time.

Don’t miss this extraordinary collection of art. See which new ridge painting resembles a cake good enough to eat and another like a swirl of chocolate gelato ready to be scooped up.

What’s not to love in North Beach?

I know, the messy and disruptive subway to nowhere dig, loss of old Italian businesses. Don’t get me started. I’m in a wonderful mood this morning.