Lamb Chop and Artichoke Kitchen Invasion

More Roman Food in North Beach. Bravo!

Maurizio Bruschi, the chef/owner of Ideale, the classic North Beach Roman restaurant on Grant for over 20 years, and his partner Giuseppe Terminiello, recently opened Piccolo Forno on Columbus.

Piccolo Forno brings another Roman culinary tradition to North Beach, pizza al taglia, pizza by the cut. You find these shops all over Rome. One of my favorites is La Ranella in Trastevere and Piccolo Forno is in that same elite class.

But I’m headed to Ideale to cook with Maurizio. We were in a springtime frame of mind and in Roma that means young spring lamb and the first crop of artichokes.

Carciofi alla Romana is a simple preparation. Maurizio cleaned a large artichoke in a flash. The artichokes went upside down in a pot with a bath of water, white wine, extra virgin olive oil and a few aromatics.

Potatoes were tossed with extra virgin olive oil, rosemary and garlic and roasted in the oven.

But the star of this meal was the scottadito (“burn the finger”). The chops, simply seasoned with salt and black pepper, are so good you burn your fingers because you can’t wait to pick them up and eat those lollipops as they come hot off the grill.

Maurizio laid the crispy, creamy roasted potatoes down on a big platter ringed by tender, flavorful artichokes with a hint of mint and the lamb chops just off the grill atop the potatoes. Scatter some lemon on the plate. Squeeze a drop or two on the lamb chop, if you wish. Ah, Roman spring right here on Grant Avenue.

We always eat very well when in Rome. I have to say this North Beach meal is right up there with the best classics I’ve had in Rome.

Grazie Maurizio. Bravo!

Note: We shot this episode in April. Apologies for the late release. However, this meal is worth making any time of year as long as the ingredients are available in your local market. Buon appetito!

Scottadito

  1. Baby spring lamb is in the market now. Get yourself a rack of baby loin lamb chops. Have your butcher divide them for you.
  2. There’s no recipe here because there’s no need to mess with these tender chops.  Maurizio pounded them a bit for uniform thickness.
  3. Sprinkle the chops with salt and a grind of black pepper to taste and slap them down on a hot grill or hot grill pan atop your stove.
  4. The scottadito only take a couple of minutes on each side. The Romans like their lamb well-done but choose the doneness you like best.  You’ll be burning your fingers too. It doesn’t hurt too much.
  5. Don’t forget to give the chops a squeeze of lemon before eating these lollipops.

Carciofi alla Romana

Ingredients

  • 4 medium artichokes
  • 1-cup water
  • 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup dry white wine
  • 2 sprigs Italian flat parsley, leaves only, roughly chopped
  • 2-3 fresh mint leaves, roughly chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, sliced thin
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Put enough water to cover the cleaned artichokes in a bowl large enough to hold the cleaned artichokes.
  2. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze the lemon into the water. Put the lemon rind in the water too. (The acidulated water will keep the artichokes from discoloring before you cook them.)
  3. Cut off the tough top of the artichokes at the point where the dark green leaves turn to light green/yellow.
  4. Trim the remaining leaves to remove the dark green outer leave.
  5. Peel the stem.
  6. Open the artichoke and with a spoon, remove the choke, if any.
  7. Put the cleaned artichoke into the acidulated water.
  8. Put a large pot over high heat. Add one tablespoon of olive oil.
  9. When the oil begins to ripple, place the artichokes stem up in the oil and push them down with your hand to open them and to brown them a bit.
  10. Add the water, wine, garlic, the remaining tablespoon of olive oil, parsley and mint and bring the pot to a boil.
  11. Lower the heat to medium-low and bring the liquid to a gentle simmer. (If need be add more water. But in the end you want about half the original volume to create a flavorful pan sauce.)
  12. Cover the pot with a lid or cover the artichokes with crumpled damp butcher paper.
  13. Let the artichokes steam until they are knife tender, about 20 minutes.
  14. Remove the artichokes to a serving platter.
  15. Spoon some of the cooking pan sauce over each artichoke.
  16. Serve immediately.

Oven Roasted Potatoes

Ingredients

  • 4 potatoes (I prefer Yukon Gold)
  • 1 clove of garlic, sliced thin
  • 1 sprig of fresh rosemary, leaves stripped from the stem
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Heat the oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Peel the potatoes and cut them into 2-inch cubes.
  3. Put the potatoes, olive oil, garlic and rosemary in a baking dish, add salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Coat the potatoes with the olive oil mixture.
  5. Roast the potatoes in the hot oven until they begin to brown and are knife-tender, about 20 minutes.
  6. Remove the potatoes to a serving platter.
  7. Serve immediately.

Cooking Foraged Chicory in Roma

My HP Production crew devouring spaghetti cacao e pepe I cooked in my Rome kitchen
My HP Production crew devouring saltimbocca I cooked in my Rome kitchen

The last time I was in Italy I hooked up with my friend Luca and the crew from his video company, HB Productions. We spent days together shopping and shooting episodes of me cooking in my apartment near the Spanish Steps.

Here’s the first of those HB Production episodes just in time as early spring vegetables hit the farmers market.

I shopped every day in Campo dei Fiori, the huge open air market in the historical center of Rome. I was lucky to meet Alessandro who had a produce stand there. He was my guide to the spring vegetables he had to offer.

This day he had wild chicory, cicoria, he foraged early that morning in the hills near his home outside of Rome. He sold me the chicory with a condition. “Cook it with olive oil and lots of garlic, that’s all.” “And chili pepper,” I said. Alessandro agreed and added “but no lemon, no lemon.” Boy, these Italians are strict but that was my plan anyway.

What a wonderful Slow Food moment, scoring locally foraged cicoria to cook in my Rome apartment a few blocks away from the market! Watch me use a versatile, simple method to respectfully coax maximum flavor from this humble wild green. Here in the U.S. curly endive is the closest to the wild chicory I cooked in Rome.

You may have seen some of the Rome footage in this Hungry Village production. Get a peek of Luca and his aunt Giulia, the best cook in the family, who joined me in the kitchen for a couple of episodes.

I hope to have the other Rome episodes ready to post soon. Stay tuned but in the meantime here’s my saltimbocca recipe.

So You Want To Be An American? is the music in the episode. I love the tune. Here’s hip Neapolitan crooner Renato Carosone’s 1958 rendition of his Tu Vuo Fa L’Americano.

Keep on cooking. Buon appetito!

5.0 from 1 reviews
Cooking Foraged Chicory in Roma
 
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A simple chicory preparation that you can use for other leafy greens too.
Author:
Recipe type: Vegetables
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 1 pound chicory (curly endive)
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 cloves of garlic, smashed
  • pinch of chili flake
  • sea salt to taste
Instructions
  1. Bring about 4 cups of water to a boil in a pot.
  2. Add the chicory and blanch for a minute or two.
  3. Heat the oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and chili flakes to the pan and cook until the garlic just begins to take on some color.
  4. Drain the chicory and add it to the sauté pan. Add sea salt to taste.
  5. Stir well to dress the chicory with the oil.
  6. Serve immediately.

 

 

Pasta Primavera: Bow tie pasta with early spring vegetables

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Pasta Primavera
Pasta primavera is spring on a plate.

I love this time of year when the first of the early spring vegetables start to hit the market. Pencil-thin asparagus, tiny peas, and tender fava beans are among my favorites, so I just had to make pasta primavera with these spring farmers’ market beauties.

But the nice thing about pasta primavera is that it’s versatile enough to work well with all kinds of produce. Asparagus not looking so good? Use artichokes instead! Are those gorgeous ramps on sale this week? Use those! Just pick whatever’s fresh and delicious in your market and you can’t go wrong.

This dish is inspired by the original Spaghetti alla Primavera from Sirio Maccioni, co-owner of Le Cirque restaurant in New York City–it’s a real Italian-American classic. I’ve lightened the dish up by using no butter and less cream, and this keeps the spring vegetables in sharp focus. Instead, pasta water creates a flavorful broth as the base of the sauce and bow tie pasta instead of spaghetti guarantees you get some veggies with every bite.

I prefer the more robust ricotta salata flavor instead of parmigiano as a finishing note, but different strokes, right? And extra virgin olive oil does put some fat back into this really healthy, full-flavored taste of springtime, I’ll give you that, but come on, a little ain’t gonna kill ya.

I made farfalle alla primavera a few years ago at my cooking demonstration and tasting at The Villages in San Jose. I was cooking for 50 Italian-Americans and wannabes and I needed a boat-load of vegetables, so while setting up for the show I enlisted a dozen of my students to shell the peas and fava beans and cut the asparagus. When all the work was done, one of my prep helpers said “Next time use frozen!” Well, of course you can, but it won’t be as good as using fresh from the farmer’s market–the extra work means extra flavor and who don’t want that?

The full flavor of the spring vegetables rule this simple, uncluttered pasta dish that is ready in the time it takes to cook the pasta.  After you shell the peas and fava that is. Just make sure none of your helpers throw them pea pods at ya.

And if you like this, also try my recipe for spring asparagus frittata. It’s another great way to get spring on a plate.

Buon appetito!

Pasta Primavera: Bow Tie Pasta with Early Spring Vegetables
 
Bow tie pasta with fresh spring peas, lava beans and asparagus in a light cream sauce.
Author:
Recipe type: pasta
Cuisine: Italian
Ingredients
  • 1 cup fava beans
  • 1 pound or 500 grams Farfalle dried pasta
  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 spring onions, cut in 1-inch slices
  • 8 thin asparagus spears, cut on a bias in 2-inch pieces
  • 1 cup shelled fresh peas
  • 10 ripe cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • ¼ cup heavy cream
  • 5 basil leaves, ripped by hand
  • ¼ cup grated ricotta salata or grated parmigiano
  • sea salt, freshly ground black pepper and finishing olive oil to taste
Instructions
  1. Remove the fava beans from the pod and blanch them in the hot pasta water for a minute or two. Take the fava beans out of the water and when cool remove the wrinkled skin from the fava.
  2. Bring a large pot of well salted water to a boil over high heat.
  3. Add the farfalle to the boiling water and cook until just al dente.
  4. In the meantime, put a large saute pan over medium-high and add 2 tablespoons of the extra virgin olive oil and add the garlic.
  5. When the garlic starts to give off its aroma add the spring onion.
  6. When the onion is translucent, add the asparagus and fava beans sprinkle with sea salt and sauté for a minute or two until the asparagus takes on a deeper green color.
  7. Add a cup of the pasta water to the sauté pan and cover the pan. Cover the pan and cook for 2 minutes or until the asparagus and fava are tender.
  8. Add the peas and cherry tomatoes, another cup of pasta water and cook until the peas and tomatoes are wrinkled, for a minute or two more.
  9. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil and the cream and mix well. Cook to reduce and thicken the sauce.
  10. Drain the farfalle when just al dente and put them in the pan. Stir the farfalle well with the primavera sauce. (Add more pasta water if the sauce is too dense.)
  11. Stir in the basil.
  12. Off the heat add a sprinkle of freshly ground black pepper and the grated cheese.
  13. Drizzle the farfalle with your finishing extra virgin olive oil and serve immediately.

 

Spring Asparagus Frittata

Spring Asparagus Frittata

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Spring Asparagus Frittata
Pencil-thin asparagus is just barely held together by egg in this spring frittata.

I made this asparagus frittata last spring while in Rome. Allesandro, my friend and produce vendor in Campo de Fiori, the huge open air produce market in the historical center of Rome, showed me wild asparagus he had foraged the night before. It took him all night to collect 2 kilos.

That’s Allesandro in video episode showing me those skinny wild asparagus that quickly went into a frittata for my mates back in our apartment near Piazza di Spagna.

I found some really thin asparagus at the farmers market. They reminded me of the frittata I made in Rome and I had to make it here in San Francisco.

I roasted the asparagus with olive oil and sea salt to intensify its bright flavor. This is a thinner frittata than I usually make because I want the egg mixture to just hold the asparagus together and let the concentrated springtime flavor shine.

Watch me make a sausage and potato frittata and see another asparagus frittata recipe where I don’t roast the asparagus but cook it in the same pan that I use to cook the frittata.

Serve frittata as a part of your antipasti or as a light lunch or dinner with a salad and a hunk of crusty bread. When I’m not in the mood to cook frittata is my go to recipe. It’s ready to eat in less than 30 minutes. Buon appetito!

Asparagus Fritatta
 
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Author:
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 8-10 asparagus spears
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons chopped Italian flat parsley
  • ¼ cup grated pecorino, parmigiana or grana padano
  • Sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. Heat the oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Put the asparagus on a cooking sheet and drizzle with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and a sprinkle of sea salt. Toss the asparagus to cover them all with the oil.
  3. Roast in the oven until the asparagus begins to brown, about 8 minutes. Turn them at least once.
  4. Take the asparagus out of the oven and when cool cut them on the diagonal in 2-inch pieces. Set the asparagus aside.
  5. Add the eggs to a large bowl and beat them well.
  6. Add the asparagus, parsley, grated cheese, ½ teaspoon sea salt and ¼ teaspoon black pepper and mix all the ingredients well.
  7. Put a 9-inch cast-iron or saute pan over medium-high heat and add 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Swirl the olive oil so it coats the sides of the pan well to avoid the sides of the frittata from sticking.
  8. When the oil starts to ripple the add the egg mixture to the pan. Reduce the heat to medium-low.
  9. As the frittata begins to set stir the bottom of the frittata with a fork. With a spatula lightly pull the edge of frittata away from the side of the pan. Genly slide the spatula under the frittata. Be sure the frittata is loose and moves easily when you shake the pan.
  10. Place a plate over the pan and flip the pan so the frittata ends up on the plate.
  11. Slide the frittata back in the pan.
  12. Finish cooking the frittata until it is solid.
  13. (If you don’t want the flip the frittata, finish cooking it in a 375 degree oven until the top sets and browns.)
  14. Slide the frittata onto a serving plate and serve immediately or at room temperature.

 

Risi e Bisi: Venetian Rice & Spring Peas

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Venetian Rice and Spring Peas
Risi e bisi is the perfect first course to celebrate early spring vegetables!

In the run-up to Ash Wednesday earlier this week Venetians ended their 12-day Carnevale celebration. It was their last raucous blow-out before the arrival of Lent and 40-days of fasting.

The traditional festivities and the arrival of the first of the spring vegetables in the market compelled me to make this simple yet elegant rice and spring pea Venetian classic. Wearing my Venetian Pulcinella mask in the kitchen didn’t hurt getting in the mood either.

Risi e bisi is best made early in the spring when the peas are small and sweet. You can make this dish with larger peas later in the season or frozen peas too but it’s at it’s best when those first shiny green pea pods first appear in the market. This is not a risotto it’s a very thick soup.

Vegetarians don’t miss out on this one. Just switch out the beef broth for vegetable broth. You won’t be sorry, I guarantee.

You can eat it with a fork but I prefer a spoon so I get some of the creamy broth in each bite. The slightly firm center of the Arborio rice lends just the right textural balance to the soft, sweet peas. The earthy beef broth adds remarkable flavor depth to the dish. A sprinkle of nutty grated parmigiano and the simple but complex risi e bisi is ready to start your eating celebration.

I love to have risi e bisi as a first course or as a side for fish and meats. And if you have any left over make my suppli al telefono, fried rice balls with a surprise in the center.

Before you go, have a listen to Wynton Marsalis’ Carnival of Venice. I hope you’re inspired. Buon appetito!

Riso e Bisi: Venetian Rice & Spring Peas
 
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Author:
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons chopped yellow onion
  • ¼ cup unsalted butter
  • 2 pounds fresh unshelled peas
  • 3½ cups beef, chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 cup Arborio rice
  • 2 tablespoons chopped Italian flat leaf parsley
  • ½ cup grated parmigiano
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Put a enamel or heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the butter and when melted add the onions and saute until the onions take on a light golden color.
  2. Add the peas and sea salt to taste and saute for 2 minutes stirring frequently.
  3. Add 3½ cups of broth and cook at a rapid simmer for 10 minutes.
  4. Add the rice and parsley and stir. Cover the pot and cook at a rapid simmer until the rice is tender but still firm, about 15 minutes stirring occasionally. The rice and peas should still be a bit soupy. Add a bit more broth if necessary.
  5. Off the heat add the grated parmigiano and stir well into the rice and peas.
  6. Add a grind of black pepper and sea salt if necessary and stir well.
  7. Put the risi e bisi in individual bowls or a large serving bowl, top with a sprinkle of grated parmigiano.
  8. Pass additional grated parmigiano at the table in case your guests want a bit more.

 

Baked Baby Eggplant via Japan

Baked Baby Eggplant

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Baked baby eggplant makes a great centerpiece for an antipasti platter.
Baked baby eggplant makes a great centerpiece for an antipasti platter.

Baked Italian baby eggplant is a favorite blog text recipe post so we decided to show you how to make it. Let me know if there are other recipe posts or other Italian dishes you want me to cook and maybe we’ll add them to our upcoming video episode list.

We’re in the worst drought ever here in California.

My produce guys tell me prices are already on the rise because of the drought. 60% of America’s produce comes from California so we’ll all be paying 15-20% more.

Even as prices rise, keep on buying local organic produce. The quality of the ingredients is vital. There are only 4 key ingredients in this dish so they all have to shine.

The only two days of heavy rain this whole winter had to be when I’m out food shopping over the weekend for the 3 episodes shot on Monday. I know we need the rain but that doesn’t mean I can’t complain.

I was a man on a mission. Off I went to the Ferry Building Saturday farmer’s market in the rain. No Italian baby eggplant. I hit at least six other markets and baby Italian eggplant were nowhere to be found. All I got was wet.

I panicked. I needed eggplant for Monday’s shoot. While scouring the city I caught a glimpse of dark eggplant on a sidewalk stand as the bus passed Grant Street in Chinatown. I made my way back to the produce stand and there I found not the Italian baby eggplant I desperately needed but Japanese eggplant instead.

I prefer the baby Italian eggplant but if I can't get 'em Japanese eggplant will do just fine.
I prefer the baby Italian eggplant but if I can’t get ’em Japanese eggplant will do just fine.

I was about to pass them up when I said to myself “Hey, you got a show to shoot. Whaddaya gonna do? Buy these. Stupido! This happens to other people too, so it’s an improvisation lesson.”

After chasing all over the city, I had developed a “woolie” (a craving) for these baked eggplant. I had to make them.

So that’s why I’m using Japanese eggplant that are readily available in the market. If you can’t get the Italian baby eggplant, use the Japanese.

The taste and texture is as good as baking the small black-purple Italian ones. But if I find them in market, I go for the baby Italians every time.

Zesty crispy tomato and pecorino top sweet creamy soft eggplant inside the flavorful shriveled skin. The essence of eggplant in every single bite. Serve it by itself or as the centerpiece of an antipasti course. Just add some prosciutto & cheese to the platter and some olives too.

If you like eggplant watch me make my favorite dish eggplant parmigiano.

Keep on cooking. Buon appetito!

4.7 from 3 reviews
Baked Baby Eggplant via Japan
 
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Intense creamy baked baby eggplant topped with San Marzano tomatoes, oregano and pecorino.
Author:
Recipe type: Vegetable
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 4 Italian baby eggplants
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1 cup Italian canned San Marzano tomatoes, crushed well by hand
  • ¼ cup pecorino, grated
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • ½ cup water
Instructions
  1. Heat the oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Cut off the stem of the Italian baby eggplant and cut each in half. (If you're using Japanese eggplant, cut off most of the narrow neck.)
  3. Lightly score the top of the eggplant on the diagonal in both directions to form diamonds.
  4. Put the eggplant in a single layer in a baking dish cut side up.
  5. Drizzle each half generously with EVOO.
  6. Sprinkle sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.
  7. Evenly distribute the crushed tomato on top of each half.
  8. Sprinkle the oregano on top of the crushed tomato.
  9. Sprinkle the grated pecorino evenly on each half.
  10. Pour the water in the bottom of the baking dish.
  11. Add some olive oil and tomatoes to the water. (This will make a pan sauce to put over the eggplant before you serve them.)
  12. Cover the baking dish tightly with foil.
  13. Bake until the eggplant are knife tender, about 20 to 30 minutes.
  14. Reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees.
  15. Uncover the pan and bake until the pecorino is lightly browned and the eggplant start to collapse in on themselves, 10 to 15 minutes more.
  16. Serve hot or at room temperature.
  17. Serves 4-6

 

Black Kale Steam/Sauteed with Garlic & Chili

Tuscan Black Kale
Tuscan Black Kale
Tuscan black kale will make you want to devour your veggies!

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I love leafy vegetables cooked using this easy steam/saute method. You can have delicious and healthy vegetables on your table in about 15 minutes.

Heat up olive oil, garlic and chili flakes in a big pan. Throw in the leafy greens and coat them all with the oil. Add a little water and bring it to a rapid simmer. Cover the pan.

In a few minutes take off the lid and let the water evaporate. Saute the wilted greens in the garlic-infused oil until they’re tender.

All of the healthy vegetable goodness stays in the pan and the perfectly cooked tender greens flecked with garlic and chili flake glisten in the sheen of the olive oil.

Choose your favorite leafy vegetable, chard, brocolli rabe, escarole. But don’t be limited to greens. The steam/saute method works with most vegetables.

I cooked a vegetable with many names. Black kale because of its color. Dino(saur) kale because of the large leaf’s rough surface. Tuscan kale from the region in Italy where it is a favored ingredient for ribollita, the famous Tuscan twice boiled soup.

Call it what you want. Just make some soon. It’s vegan, Mediterranean, and if you leave out the bread, it’s even paleo!

The intense slightly bitter kale flavor is mellowed by the buttery olive oil. The heat of the chili flake warms your throat with each swallow.

Eat a bowl of kale as a light lunch or serve it as a side for your main course. Have a hunk of crusty bread handy to sop up the sauce that’s left on the plate.

Italians eat fantastic food but the Mediterranean Diet, most prominent in southern Italy, is healthy as well. I eat lots of vegetables and fruits locally grown and in season, legumes, nuts and grains. I love fish. Extra virgin olive oil is my fat of choice. I eat meat in moderation and sweets from time to time.

My meals are delicious and nutritious. Yours can be too.

So eat your vegetables! Roast some sausage to serve with steam/sauteed broccoli rabe for a complete meal. Or for something entirely different make a green bean and red onion salad.

Gianni’s Tip: I removed the thick tough stem at the base of each kale leaf. I saved the stems as I do with all my vegetable trimmings. Set the trimmings aside and throw them in the pot the next time you make a broth or soup for extra flavor. If you don’t use the trimmings immediately, just bag them and put them in the freezer for later.

Use it all up. Head towards zero waste in your kitchen. You’ll be happy and the planet will be too.

Buon appetito!

5.0 from 2 reviews
Black Kale Steam/Sauteed with Garlic & Chili
 
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Author:
Recipe type: vegetables
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 2 bunches of kale (look for "Lacinato" on the tag) or your favorite leafy vegetable
  • 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
  • ⅛ teaspoon crushed hot red pepper flakes
  • sea salt to taste
  • ½ cup water
Instructions
  1. Wash the kale well.
  2. Cut out the tough stem as the bottom of each leaf.
  3. Cut the kale into 2 inch ribbons.
  4. Put the olive oil, pepper flakes and garlic in a large pot with a lid and heat the oil over medium heat until the garlic just starts to turn translucent.
  5. Add the kale and sea salt to taste.
  6. Pour in the water, bring to a rapid simmer, and cover the pot tightly with the lid.
  7. Steam, lifting the lid to stir occasionally, until the kale is wilted, about 5 minutes.
  8. Uncover and cook over medium heat until the liquid is mostly evaporated and the kale is tender, about 5 minutes.
  9. Serve immediately.

 

Start Thanksgiving Dinner with Crab & Vegetables in a Hot Bath

Anchovy Garlic Hot Dipping Sauce for Crab & Veggies
Anchovy Garlic Hot Dipping Sauce for Crab & Veggies

The dungeness crab season started a couple of weeks ago and the harvest is superb.

So here’s a simple delicious start for your Thanksgiving dinner, steamed crab and vegetables with bagna cauda, a flavorful anchovy-garlic hot dipping sauce.

This is a super easy dish. Buy some fresh-steamed and cleaned crab, dungeness here in the Bay Area, blue crab on the east coast.

Cut up your favorite vegetables. Serve the vegetables raw or blanch them for a couple of minutes in boiling water if you like. Slice some cubes of crusty, rustic bread.

Make the bagna caulda dipping broth in 5 minutes. Keep it hot on the stove until you’re ready to eat. You can serve it over a flame in a fondue pot or a small earthenware pot over a candle-warmer.

I just put the steaming bagna cauda in a small pot on the table without a flame. It’s usually all gone before it cools off.

Crab, multi-color carrots, zucchini, red bell pepper and green beans and crusty bread surround the bagna calda. You can leave the cracked crab in the shell to dip but I wanted to make it easier to enjoy. Drizzle some bagna calda over the crab pieces so your guests can scoop up some of the pieces too small to dip .

Dip the large crab pieces and the vegetables in the bagna cauda. Hold the bread underneath to catch any drippings as you transport the crab and vegetables to your salivating mouth. Dip the bread in the sauce, eat it and start all over again. It’s a fun antipasto to share.

The mellow briny anchovy-garlic infused oil is a perfect boost for the sweet meaty crab and crunchy veggies .

Here are some other suggestions to add a bit of Italy to your American Thanksgiving meal.

Best wishes for a wonderful time with family and friends at your Thanksgiving table.

Buon appetito!

Bagna Cauda-A Hot Dipping Sauce
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Antipasto
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • ¾ cup olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed and then finely chopped
  • 8 anchovy fillets, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon minced flat-leaf parsley, chopped
Instructions
  1. Put the olive oil and butter In a small sauté pan or small pot over low heat.
  2. Add the butter and olive oil to the pan. When the butter is melted and just starts to foam add the garlic and sauté briefly, until the garlic starts to give off its aroma, about a minute. (Don't allow the garlic to take on any color.)
  3. Add the anchovies to the pan and cook stirring frequently until the anchovies dissolve.
  4. Add the parsley and stir well.
  5. Serve the bagna calda immediately in a small crockery pot or bowl along with the crab, vegetables and bread.

 

Cabbage Steam-Sauteed with Pancetta

Sauteed Cabbage with Pancetta
Sauteed Cabbage with Pancetta

Desperation one night led to this tasty dish.

I bought a head of cabbage intending to make an Italian-American cole slaw. It didn’t happen. Now what?

As I looked in the fridge for something to eat when I got home from a long day at work the cabbage caught my eye. Next to the cabbage was a fat slice of house-cured pancetta from my butcher. Bingo!

In less than a half-hour those 2 ingredients and a hunk of crusty bread became my light dinner.

Saute small cubes of pancetta in a pot with a little olive oil. When the pancetta is golden-brown add the cabbage and toss the cabbage with the pancetta. Season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Add a little water, cover the pot and let the cabbage steam until it is soft and tender, about 10 minutes. Uncover and cook the cabbage until the water is almost all gone.

Put the cabbage on a serving plate and drizzle with olive oil and your done.

The mellow sweet cabbage strewn with salty, meaty pancetta is a complex taste and texture treat, simply delicious. So much flavor from just 2 quickly cooked ingredients.

Serve the cabbage as a side for meat and fish or eat it up for a light meal.

Buon appetito!

5.0 from 1 reviews
Cabbage Steam-Sauteed with Pancetta
 
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2 ingredients, cabbage and pancetta, quickly cooked yield a dish with full flavor and texture for a light meal or a side for meat or fish.
Author:
Recipe type: Vegetables
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 1 head of cabbage
  • ¼ pound pancetta, cut in 1-inch cubes
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, plus a finishing drizzle
  • sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • ½ cup water
Instructions
  1. Cut the cabbage into quarters.
  2. Cut out the core and thinly slice the cabbage.
  3. Put the olive oil in a large pot over medium-high heat.
  4. When the oil is hot add the pancetta and sauté until the pancetta is golden brown all over.
  5. Add the cabbage, sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste and mix the cabbage well with the pancetta.
  6. Add ½ cup of water and bring to a boil.
  7. Lower the heat to medium-low and cover the pot and cook until the cabbage is soft and tender.
  8. Uncover and cook until the water is almost all evaporated.
  9. Put the cabbage and pancetta on a serving platter, drizzle with extra virgin olive oil and serve immediately.

 

Broccoli Rabe and Italian Sausage

Sauteed broccoli rabe and roasted Sicilian & Calabrese sausages
Sauteed broccoli rabe and roasted Sicilian & Calabrese sausages

Here’s one of my favorite dishes that’s easy and quick to make for a weeknight dinner. You’ll be eating in a half hour or so.

Roast the sausage in a hot 425 degree oven until they’re golden brown.

While the sausage is roasting steam/saute the broccoli rabe in a big covered pot with garlic, red pepper flakes and extra virgin olive oil.

The broccoli rabe is infused with garlic and the hot chili flakes add a perky sparkle as you swallow.

I chose two Little City Meats homemade sausages to diversify a bit. One is the mild Sicilian with fennel seeds the other a hot Calabrese with dried chili.

Sometimes I want to extend the heat and I’ll grab a hot Calabrese. Sometimes I want to calm it all down and go for the mild Sicilian instead. Either way with a crusty chunk of Italian bread you’ll be in heaven.

For a vegetarian alternative I often just have a bowl of broccoli rabe with a hunk of crusty bread to soak up the cooking broth.

Either way quick, healthy and delicious. Your dinner all on one plate.

Buon appetito!

Broccoli Rabe and Italian Sausage
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 2 bunches of broccoli rabe
  • 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
  • 1½ pounds your favorite Italian sausages
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
  • ⅛ teaspoon crushed hot red pepper flakes
  • sea salt to taste
  • ¼ cup water
Instructions
  1. Heat the oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Put the sausages in a roasting pan large enough so that they have room between them so they'll roast and not steam.
  3. While the sausage is roasting prepare the broccoli rabe.
  4. Remove any wilted or discolored leaves and the tough large leaf from each broccoli rabe stem.
  5. Cut off the tough bottom end of each stem. (You can peel the lower end of the stem but I usually cut it at the juncture of the floret stem and the lowest leaf.)
  6. Wash the broccoli rabe and drain them.
  7. Put the olive oil, pepper flakes and garlic in a large pot with a lid and heat the oil over medium heat until the garlic just starts to turn translucent.
  8. Add the broccoli rabe and sea salt to taste.
  9. Pour in the water, bring to a boil, and cover the pot tightly with the lid.
  10. Steam, lifting the lid to stir occasionally, until the broccoli rabe is softened, about 5 minutes.
  11. Uncover and cook over medium heat until the liquid is evaporated and the broccoli rabe is tender, about 5 minutes.
  12. (If you want a milder broccoli rabe blanch them in boiling water for about 30 seconds and drain them before adding to the hot olive oil. Finish cooking as above.)
  13. Return the sausages to the pot to warm them through.
  14. Serve the sausages on a platter, with the broccoli rabe on the side.

Escarole 2 Ways

Escarole sauteed in olive oil, garlic, chili flakes and sea salt
Escarole sauteed in olive oil with garlic, chili flakes and sea salt

The escarole in the market today was gorgeous, light green heads with fresh, tender leaves. I get 2 uses from a head of escarole.

Save the yellow-green inner leaves for a simple salad dressed with extra virgin olive oil, fresh lemon or red wine vinegar and sea salt. Serve the escarole salad as a first course or as an accompaniment for meat, fish or pasta.

Another favorite for the rest of the darker green outer leaves is to quickly saute the escarole with olive oil, garlic, chili flakes and sea salt (scarola in padella).

The escarole is sweet and tender bathed in the garlic-infused olive oil with a bit of chili heat. Healthy and delicious. Serve the sauteed escarole as a side for meat or fish.

Sometimes for a light meal, I’ll just have a bowl of sauteed escarole with a hunk of crusty bread that I dip in the olive oil broth.

This is an easy dish and a universal cooking method for most green leafy vegetables that I use often. Add it to your repertoire.

Buon appetito!

Escarole 2 Ways
 
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Author:
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 1 head escarole, remove the core, (optional: save the tender yellow-green inner leaves for a salad), cut the head in half, and cut in 2 inch ribbons
  • 1 garlic clove, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • ¼ teaspoon red chili flakes (optional)
  • ¼ cup water (if needed)
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Put the EVOO, garlic and red chili flakes in a cold pan.
  2. Heat over medium-high until the garlic takes on a bit of golden color.
  3. Add the escarole and toss so that all the leaves wilt.
  4. Season with sea salt and black pepper.
  5. If there is no liquid in the pan add some water to help steam the escarole.
  6. Saute for 3 minutes or until the escarole is tender.
  7. Place the escarole in a bowl and drizzle with a little very good EVOO.
  8. Serve immediately.

 

Veal and Spring Peas from Naples

A Neapolitan classic, veal with spring peas
A Neapolitan classic, veal with spring peas

We trained to Naples from Rome and settled in to our apartment in the Spanish Quarter high above Via Chiaia and Via Toledo, Naples major shopping streets.

We have a half floor of an old palazzo and our landlady Filomene lives right next door. She gave us a tour of the apartment and the well-appointed kitchen. I have to light the stove with one of those sparking tools.

Filomene recommended an osteria around the corner for our first midday meal, an informal family run place. We were hungry and we went to eat before we even unpacked.

The owner welcomed us as he opened the door with his baby in his arms. We felt like we were eating in their dining room. The food was superb, a warm welcome to Napoli.

I had fiori di zucca as my appetizer, zucchini flowers stuffed with mozzarella and anchovy, dipped in a light batter and fried. Next spaghetti a ragu, a flavorful dark red tomato sauce. Beef braciola, a beef roll stuffed with garlic, pecorino and parsley ended my meal.

I was out today to shop in the outdoor markets in the streets around our apartment. I couldn’t get vitello e piselli out of my mind, so that’s today’s recipe.

Tender cubes of veal with sweet spring peas in a garlic and oregano infused tomato sauce. This is one of my favorite comfort foods that my Mom made often.

Veal and peas is quick and easy if you use a good cut of veal. It can be on your table in about 30 minutes.

Buon appetito!

Veal and Spring Peas from Naples
 
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A classic veal and spring peas dish in an oregano and garlic infused tomato sauce from Naples.
Author:
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 1 pound veal loin, cubed
  • 1 pound peas in the pod, shelled
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 cups tomato passato (sauce from Italy) or San Marzano tomatoes crushed well by hand
Instructions
  1. Put a large saute pan over medium-high heat.
  2. Add the olive oil.
  3. When the oil is hot and starts to ripple add the veal and cook until browned all over.
  4. Add the garlic, oregano and peas and mix well.
  5. Cook until the garlic is translucent and the peas start to turn bright green.
  6. Add the tomato and stir well.
  7. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until the veal and peas are tender, about 12 minutes.
  8. Serve immediately.

 

Pasta & Chickpea Soup (Pasta e Ceci)

Pasta e ceci, pasta with chickpeas is a toothy, delicious soup from Rome
Pasta e ceci, pasta with chickpeas is a toothy, delicious soup from Rome

I’ll be in Rome and Naples soon so I’ve been cooking dishes from both cities to get ready for the trip.

Here’s another Roman favorite that would be at home in Naples as well. The Romans prefer long pasta in their chickpea soup and the Neapolitans prefer short pasta.

My Mom made it with ditali, a short pasta tube. I made this one with broken taglierini, a long flat pasta.

Smashed potato thickens the garlic and rosemary infused tomato broth. The chickpeas add meaty texture to the silky pasta. This soup is really satisfying and it’s good for you too.

Sometimes pasta e ceci will be lunch with a hunk of rustic bread and maybe a small salad.

While I’m in Rome, my friend Luca and his crew will shoot my shopping trips to Campo di Fiori and other neighborhood markets and me cooking in my apartment kitchen near the Spanish Steps. It should be an adventure. I’m a little nervous.

To get you in the mood for the shoots from Italia, we’ll soon post 2 episodes we shot a couple of weeks ago at Cookhouse here in North Beach, a Roman treat and a meal in a pouch from the Bay of Naples.

Buon appetito!

5.0 from 2 reviews
Pasta & Chickpea Soup (Pasta e Ceci)
 
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Pasta e ceci is a simple Italian peasant chickpea soup full of flavor and texture.
Author:
Recipe type: soup
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 2 cups chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
  • 6 cloves garlic, smashed
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 large sprig of fresh rosemary
  • 1 14-ounce can imported San Marzano tomatoes, smashed by hand
  • 6 cups water
  • 2 small potatoes, peeled and quartered
  • ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes or 1 small dried chili
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • ½ pound taglierini or other long, flat pasta broken into 3-inch pieces.
  • 1 tablespoon fresh Italian parsley, minced
  • grated pecorino (optional)
Instructions
  1. If your using dried chickpeas, soak them overnight. Cook them in rapidly simmering water until tender, at least an hour. Save the cooking water. Canned garbanzo beans work well too.
  2. Put a large pot of well-salted water (5 quarts water, 2 tablespoons sea salt) over high and bring to a boil for the pasta. (If you don't want to clean another pot, you can cook the pasta right in the soup.)
  3. Put a soup pot over medium heat and add the olive oil, garlic and rosemary.
  4. Saute until the garlic starts to brown.
  5. Remove the garlic and rosemary.
  6. Pour the tomatoes and their juice, the chickpeas and the potatoes into the pot.
  7. Add the water to the pot. (If you cooked dry beans, use the cooking water.)
  8. Raise the heat to medium-high and cook until the potatoes are knife tender, about 10 minutes.
  9. Remove the potatoes to a plate and roughly smash them with a fork. You want some intact small pieces too. Return the potatoes to the pot.
  10. Add sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.
  11. Simmer for 30 minutes.
  12. If the soup is too thick, add some of water and bring the soup back to a simmer.
  13. Cook the pasta in the boiling water until very al dente.
  14. Drain the pasta.
  15. Add the pasta to the soup pot and cook for about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  16. Serve the soup in individual bowls immediately with a sprinkle of parsley and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil. (In Naples, they would add a sprinkle of grated pecorino too.)

 

This may be my last dish from Rome. After Rome we’re moving to an apartment in Naples and then on to the Amalfi coast and the beach near Gaeta. I have to move south to the food of Campania. So, the recipes I post this weekend will be 2 of my favorite dishes from Naples.

Roman Stewed Spring Vegetables

La Vignarola, Roman stewed spring vegetables
La Vignarola, Roman stewed spring vegetables

La Vignarola, stewed spring vegetables, is a simple dish that’s a real crowd-pleaser in Rome this time of year and you can be eating some in about 30 minutes.

Quickly braise each of the 3 spring vegetables separately. Brown guanciale or pancetta with a little extra virgin olive oil. Add the vegetables to the pan along with some of the cooking liquid to make a light broth.

When everything is heated through put the vegetables on a serving platter. Sprinkle with sea salt and black pepper and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and your ready to eat. Serve La Vignarola as a side-dish or as a first course with a hunk of rustic bread to sop up the flavorful broth.

The sweetness of the peas is mellowed by the meaty fava beans and tender sliced artichoke hearts. With your first bite you know spring has arrived.

I’ll be in Roma soon and my Roman friend Luca and his crew will shoot a couple of episodes while I shop the outdoor markets and cook in our apartment kitchen near the Spanish Steps. You might have noticed I’ve been cooking Roman dishes lately to get in the groove.

We shot 2 new episodes last week at Cookhouse in North Beach as a run-up to my Italy trip. Watch me making a Roman favorite for your antipasti or afternoon snack (uno spuntino) and a classic main course from Naples. We’ll post the first one real soon.

Buon appetito!

Roman Stewed Spring Vegetables
 
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La Vignarola, stewed artichokes, fava beans and peas Roman-style.
Author:
Recipe type: Side dish
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 4 small artichokes
  • 2 pounds fava beans
  • 2 pounds spring peas
  • 2 ounces guanciale or pancetta, cut into small cubes
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 green onions
  • sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Squeeze the juice of a lemon into a bowl of water. As you clean the artichokes, put them in the acidulated water until your ready to braise them all. (This keeps the artichokes from oxidizing and turning brown.)
  2. Pull off the tough outer leaves of the artichokes until you get to leaves that are light green-yellow in color.
  3. Cut off the dark top of the artichoke.
  4. Cut off the stem evenly and peel off any green tough skin on the artichoke base.
  5. With a spoon, scoop out the choke (small purple leaves and fuzzy center) in the middle of artichoke. (If your using baby artichokes, they won't have developed a choke yet.)
  6. Shell the peas and set aside in a bowl.
  7. Shell the fava beans, remove the skin and set aside in a bowl.
  8. Put a cup of water in a small pot over medium-high heat and add the artichokes.
  9. When the water boils cover the pot and lower the heat to medium-low.
  10. Braise the artichokes until they are knife tender, about 10 minutes.
  11. With a slotted spoon, remove the artichokes to a bowl and set aside to cool.
  12. Add more water to the pot if necessary, raise the heat to medium-high and add the fava beans.
  13. When the water boils cover the pot and lower the heat to medium-low.
  14. Braise the fava beans until tender, about 7 minutes. (Don't over cook the fava beans or they'll lose their bright green color.)
  15. With a slotted spoon, remove the fava beans to the bowl with the artichokes.
  16. Add more water to the pot if necessary, raise the heat to medium-high and add the peas.
  17. When the water boils cover the pot and lower the heat to medium-low.
  18. Braise the peas until tender, about 5 minutes. (Don't over cook the peas or they'll lose their bright green color.)
  19. With a slotted spoon, remove the peas to the bowl with the other vegetables.
  20. Save the vegetable cooking water.
  21. Cut the artichokes in half and cut the artichoke half in 1-inch slices and put the slices back in the bowl with the other vegetables.
  22. Slice the green onions in 1-inch pieces.
  23. Cut the guanciale or pancetta into 1-inch cubes.
  24. Put another pan over medium-high heat and pour in 1 tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil.
  25. When the oil is hot add the guaciale or pancetta and brown.
  26. Add the green onions and cook until soft.
  27. Lower the heat to meidum-low, add the artichokes, fava beans and peas to the pan along with 1 cup of the vegetable cooking water.
  28. Simmer until the vegetables are heated through.
  29. Put the vegetables on a serving platter and sprinkle with sea salt and black pepper to taste and a sprinkle of extra virgin olive oil.
  30. Serve immediately.

 

Eggplant Rollatini

Fried eggplant stuffed with ricotta and mozzarella baked in the oven with marinara sauce.
Fried eggplant stuffed with ricotta and mozzarella baked in the oven with marinara sauce.

You know how much I love eggplant and this is one of my favorite dishes.

On my restaurant’s menu in the 80s, Eggplant Rollatini was a popular main dish. I ate it often at the end of the evening service.

Make the marinara sauce, fry the eggplant, stuff and bake the rollatini in the oven. You can make this flavorful dish in about an hour.

The creamy ricotta filling is wrapped in crispy eggplant and salty prosciutto. The mild San Marzano tomato, basil and garlic sauce echoes the eggplant’s sweetness.

Watch my eggplant parmigiano video episode to see how to coat and fry the eggplant. Watch me whip up a ricotta filling in my ravioli video episode. But be sure to follow this recipe for the best Eggplant Rollatini ever.

Buon appetito!

Eggplant Rollatini
 
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Crispy fried eggplant with a ricotta and prosciutto filling is baked topped with a simple marinara sauce.
Author:
Recipe type: vegetables
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • For the Eggplant
  • 2 eggplants
  • 1 cup flour
  • 3 tablespoons EVOO
  • For the Egg Wash
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons grated pecorino or parmigiano
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat Italian parsley
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • For the Ricotta Filling
  • 16 ounces ricotta
  • 8 ounces mozzarella, cut in 1-inch cubes
  • ¼ cup grated pecorino or parmigiano
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat Italian parsley
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • For the Marinara Sauce
  • 28 ounce can imported Italian San Marzano tomatoes
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon EVOO
  • 1 sprig fresh basil
  • sea salt to taste
  • ¼ cup grated pecorino or parmigiano cheese for topping the rollatini before baking
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Making the Marinara Sauce
  3. Put the tomatoes in a large bowl and crush them with your hands (or a potato masher). Remove any large stems and skin.
  4. Put the oil and the garlic in a pot over medium-high heat.
  5. Saute the garlic until it takes on a light tan color.
  6. Add the tomatoes to the pot.
  7. Add sea salt to taste.
  8. Add the basil and simmer over low heat stirring occasionally until the volume reduces by one-third.
  9. Frying the Eggplant
  10. Cut off the ends of the eggplant. Slice the eggplant in ½ inch slices lengthwise. (I don't peel the eggplant so I discard the first and last slice that is completely covered by the black skin on one side.) You should have about 15 slices to coat.
  11. Sprinkle with salt and place the slices in a colander. Put the colander in the sink or over a large plate for about 15 minutes. Bitter dark liquid will release from the eggplant slices.
  12. Wash the eggplant slices well and pat dry. Set aside.
  13. Add the eggs to a bowl large enough to hold the eggplant slices and beat them well.
  14. Add the grated cheese, parsley, sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste and beat the egg mixture well.
  15. Put 3 tablespoons of EVOO in a large saute pan and heat over medium heat.
  16. Place the egg wash on the counter closest to the saute pan.
  17. Place the the flour in a dish and place it next to the egg wash.
  18. Flour both sides of the eggplant slice. Tap off any excess flour.
  19. Coat both sides of the eggplant slice with the egg mixture.
  20. Saute the eggplant slices until both sides are golden brown.
  21. Remove the slices to a dish lined with paper towel.
  22. Continue coating and frying all of the eggplant slices. Add more oil if necessary.
  23. For the Ricotta Filling
  24. Put the ricotta in a strainer to let the liquid drain, about 15 minutes.
  25. Put the ricotta in a large bowl along with all the other ingredients and mix everything together well.
  26. Assembling the Rollatini
  27. Cover the bottom of a large baking dish with a light coating of the sauce.
  28. Put the fried eggplant on a work surface and cover each with a slice of prosciutto.
  29. Put a tablespoon of the ricotta filling on each slice about 2-inches from the narrow end of the eggplant slice.
  30. Starting at the narrow end roll up the slice and place it seam side down in the baking dish.
  31. Continue making the rollatini and place them in rows in the baking dish.
  32. Sprinkle the grated pecorino evenly over the rollatini.
  33. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, until the ricotta filling is hot and the mozzarella melts.